September 2013

John Glenn’s Wife: I Teared Up Reading it to My Wife

by Steve Ray on September 30, 2013

John & Annie Glenn (John born: July 18, 1921). True story according to Snopes.

For half a century, the world has applauded John Glenn as a
Heart-stirring American hero. He lifted the nation’s spirits when, as one of the original Mercury 7 astronauts, he was blasted alone into orbit around the Earth; the enduring affection for him is so powerful that even now people find themselves misting up at the sight of his face or the sound of his voice.

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But for all these years, Glenn has had a hero of his own, someone who he has seen display endless courage of a different kind:

Annie Glenn.

They have been married for 68 years.

He is 90; she turned 92 on Friday.

This weekend there has been news coverage of the 50th anniversary of Glenn’s flight into orbit. We are being reminded that, half a century down the line, he remains America ‘s unforgettable hero.

He has never really bought that.

Because the heroism he most cherishes is of a sort that is seldom cheered. It belongs to the person he has known longer than he has known anyone else in the world.

John Glenn and Annie Castor first knew each other when — literally — they shared a playpen.

In New Concord, Ohio, his parents and hers were friends. When the families got together, their children played.

John — the future Marine fighter pilot, the future test-pilot ace, the future astronaut — was pure gold from the start. He would end up having what it took to rise to the absolute pinnacle of American regard during the space race; imagine what it meant to be the young John Glenn in the small confines of New Concord.

Three-sport varsity athlete, most admired boy in town, Mr. Everything.

Annie Castor was bright, was caring, was talented, was generous of spirit. But she could talk only with the most excruciating of difficulty. It haunted her.

Her stuttering was so severe that it was categorized as an “85%” disability — 85% of the time, she could not manage to make words come out.

When she tried to recite a poem in elementary school, she was laughed at. She was not able to speak on the telephone. She could not have a regular conversation with a friend.

And John Glenn loved her.

Even as a boy he was wise enough to understand that people who could not see past her stutter were missing out on knowing a rare and wonderful girl.

They married on April 6, 1943. As a military wife, she found that life as she and John moved around the country could be quite hurtful. She has written: “I can remember some very painful experiences — especially the ridicule.”

In department stores, she would wander unfamiliar aisles trying to find the right section, embarrassed to attempt to ask the salesclerks for help. In taxis, she would have to write requests to the driver, because she couldn’t speak the destination out loud. In restaurants, she would point to the items on the menu.

A fine musician, Annie, in every community where she and John moved, would play the organ in church as a way to make new friends. She and John had two children; she has written: “Can you imagine living in the modern world and being afraid to use the telephone? ‘Hello’ used to be so hard for me to say. I worried that my children would be injured and need a doctor.
Could I somehow find the words to get the information across on the phone?”

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John, as a Marine aviator, flew 59 combat missions in World War II and 90 during the Korean War. Every time he was deployed, he and Annie said goodbye the same way. His last words to her before leaving were:

“I’m just going down to the corner store to get a pack of gum.”

And, with just the two of them there, she was able to always reply:

“Don’t be long.”

On that February day in 1962 when the world held its breath and the Atlas rocket was about to propel him toward space, those were their words, once again. And in 1998, when, at 77, he went back to space aboard the shuttle Discovery, it was an understandably tense time for them. What if something happened to end their life together?

She knew what he would say to her before boarding the shuttle. He did — and this time he gave her a present to hold onto:

A pack of gum.

She carried it in a pocket next to her heart until he was safely home.

Many times in her life she attempted various treatments to cure her stutter. None worked.

But in 1973, she found a doctor in Virginia who ran an intensive program she and John hoped would help her. She traveled there to enroll and to give it her best effort. The miracle she and John had always waited for at last, as miracles will do, arrived. At age 53, she was able to talk fluidly, and not in brief, anxiety-ridden, agonizing bursts.

John has said that on the first day he heard her speak to him with confidence and clarity, he dropped to his knees to offer a prayer of gratitude.

He has written: “I saw Annie’s perseverance and strength through the years and it just made me admire her and love her even more.” He has heard roaring ovations in countries around the globe for his own valor, but his awe is reserved for Annie, and what she accomplished: “I don’t know if I would have had the courage.”

Her voice is so clear and steady now that she regularly gives public talks. If you are lucky enough to know the Glenn’s, the sight and sound of them bantering and joking with each other and playfully finishing each others’ sentences is something that warms you and makes you thankful just to be in the same room.

Monday will be the anniversary of the Mercury space shot, and once again people will remember, and will speak of the heroism of Glenn the astronaut.

But if you ever find yourself at an event where the Glenn’s are appearing, and you want to see someone so brimming with pride and love that you may feel your own tears start to well up, wait until the moment that Annie stands to say a few words to the audience.

And as she begins, take a look at her husband’s eyes.

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Al and I in our younger days

This article is a great read and inspires one to hope for the faith and country. Al Kresta and I have been good friends since 1983 when I first met him upon my return from living in Switzerland.

Al was dressed in knickers and a goutee at the time, playing the part of my then hero Dr. Francis Schaeffer. Al was acting the part in a theatrical production and I was quite impressed. I approached him afterwards and said, “I was just moved back from Switzerland where I was studying with the man you just portrayed so well. Who are you?”

From that point on we have been great friends. We were men with kindred spirits and a similar love for truth and an honest search for God. Al played a huge role in my conversion to the Catholic Church and we continue to be good friends now. There are few people I respect as much as Al Kresta.

This article by John Burger in Catholic World Report is entitled Al Kresta: Catholic Missionary Looking Inward, then Outward. It is an easy read and a wonderful introduction to Al Kresta and the many facets of his amazing life. It was my pleasure to share a few thoughts with John Burger for the interview. I hope you enjoy it.

Al with the cover of his blockbuster book for Catholics

Here is an excerpt: At 62, Kresta has spent a lifetime searching for that Christ, coming to know him better and finding ways to make him better known. He regards himself primarily as a missionary, whether he is on air, producing Catholic programming, organizing conferences, writing books, or simply being a husband, father, parishioner and neighbor.

“Al Kresta is a broadcaster, journalist and author who is, first of all, a missionary,” says his bio page at Ave Maria Radio, where he serves as president and CEO.

“The point of the show and of Ave Maria Radio is to make more and better Catholics,” said Nick Thomm, executive producer and news director of “Kresta in the Afternoon.”

It was not always thus with Albert Kresta. His early life and detours through drugs, the New Age movement and other distractions are documented in Surprised by Truth: 11 Converts Give the Biblical and Historical Reasons for Becoming Catholic (ed. Patrick Madrid, 1994, Basilica Press).

At our 1st Apologetics Conference in 1997: me, Gary Michuta, Al Kresta and Patrick Madrid

“Back then, kids would take a flight at anything, just to experience it,” said Kresta’s mother, Alice, in an interview.

Kresta grew up in a Catholic family in the New Haven, Conn., area and showed early promise, excelling at a Catholic high school. His mother recalled how some of the foster children she took in at the time would climb on Al’s back—and how he took a special liking to them.

But he was 14 at the time, and the cultural winds of the 1960s soon changed him. He played in a rock band and was arrested twice for possession of illegal drugs, which he also was using, and he ended up with a two-year suspended sentence.

He stopped going to church and wound his way through strange religions, pursuing gurus in various parts of the country.

Al is not just a convert, a radio personality, author and media personality, he is truly a prophet for the 21st century. In a blurb for his book I suggested that people ignore his message to their own detriment.

Read the whole article HERE, visit his website and blog HERE and buy his exceptional new book HERE. Catholic World Report’s full interview with Al Kresta HERE.

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Seven Dangers to Human Virtue and Civilization

by Steve Ray on September 27, 2013

Wealth without work

Pleasure without conscience

Knowledge without character

Business without ethics

Science without humanity

Religion without sacrifice

Politics without principle

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Music Video Showing Daughter Surviving Abortion Gets 100,000 Views in 5 Days!

September 26, 2013

Music Video Showing Daughter Surviving Abortion Gets 100,000 Views in 5 Days  by Steven Ertelt, Brian Mayes | Washington, DC | LifeNews.com | 9/24/13 5:16 PM The former lead singer of Kansas, whose amazing video for his new single tells the story of his adopted daughter’s birth and surviving an abortion, has gone viral. Elefante [...]

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Apostles’ Deaths and Remains

September 25, 2013

This is a simple chart providing the manner of death and place of remains of Jesus’ Apostles.

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White Bread and Shot Glass of Grape Juice: But Now I am Home!

September 25, 2013

Elizabeth wrote:  I grew up Catholic, left off practice of my faith, then wandered around several churches before coming back.  It just seemed like the preaching I was hearing treated the Bible like Ann Landers, and people wanted to be soothed rather than challenged.  There would be preaching and singing but no Eucharist.  It’s like [...]

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Are the Pope’s Off-the-Cuff Comments Destroying the Church?

September 24, 2013

Interesting Article

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St. Bernadette’s Life, Lourdes and Farewells

September 22, 2013

Another great day at Lourdes, today following the life of Bernadette. Also Farewell dinner, comments and farewells. Part 1 Part 2 My 6-mile Hike through all of Lourdes

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Eastern Orthodox Challenges the Immaculate Conception

September 22, 2013

An Eastern Orthodox Christian wrote to complain about, or to see how we Catholics explain the Immaculate Conception. He said he had asked many Catholics and none could answer. I find that hard to believe. After I answered his long and slightly edgy e-mail, I received his response – “Thanks.” Picture One: Statue of Mary [...]

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Lourdes…Wow!

September 21, 2013

Started the day early with Mass at the Grotto at Lourdes – where Our Lady appeared to St. Bernadette as the Immaculate Conception. Then breakfast and a VERY thorough tour of the Shrine of Lourdes with our VERY Catholic guides: the grotto, the Shrine, underground church, the museum and much more. We finished the tour [...]

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Meaning of Sacred and Immaculate Hearts

September 21, 2013

My non-Christian brother found two paintings at an art show and asked me, “What in the world are these? They seem to have pagan elements. What do they have to do with Jesus and Mary?” Here is my explanation. If you readers have anything to add, please post it in the Comments below. Thanks. Thanks. [...]

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Humbling Message for Me from a New Priest

September 20, 2013

Dear Steve, Just a note to thank you for your apostolate and message boards. I first saw you at the very first Fullness of Truth Conference in Houston Texas, with Alex Jones, Scott Hahn, Tim Staples, ect. This conference was the crossroads where I had to face the Truth that Holy Mother Church was who, [...]

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Arriving in Lourdes

September 20, 2013

Today we drove across northern Spain and crossed the border into France. An hour later we arrived at Lourdes. It was a beautiful journey, we watched movies on the bus, pray the rosary, heard vocation stories and even took naps. I think you’ll enjoy the video with all the beautiful scenery and interaction with the [...]

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How Old is your Church?

September 20, 2013

How Old Is Your Church? If you are a Lutheran, your religion was founded by Martin Luther, an ex- monk of the Catholic Church, in the year 1517. If you belong to the Church of England, your religion was founded by King Henry VIII in the year 1534 because the Pope would not grant him [...]

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To Understand Pope Francis

September 20, 2013

From my friend Mark Brumley, President and CEO of Ignatius Press: In case you’re wondering just what’s going on with Pope Francis–and reading the New York Times and some other media outlets are bound to have that effect–I suggest you read the interview in America magazine. Francis is the best commentator on Francis: http://americamagazine.org/pope-interview For [...]

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Santiago Pilgrimage Mass to Burgos

September 19, 2013

Santiago was exceptional! Watching pilgrims come in from hiking hundreds of miles to the tomb of St. James the Apostle was truly inspiring. Mass at the Cathedral was also exceptional. Watching the incense burner swinging through the air with eight men operating it spreading incense to the whole church was quite an experience.

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