Friday, March 21, 2014

Last night my wife and I were watching an episode of Sherlock Holmes on TV. He has always been one of my favorite characters and I can remember reading all the stories to our kids as they grew up. On TV I think Jeremy Brett does the best portrayal and it is always a delightful evening to cuddle up and watch another episode.

Last night we were watching “The Copper Beeches” and Sherlock was interviewing a young lady. Her case bored him. But as her story developed, Sherlock became intrigued. He leaned back and said, “Pray, continue.” 

SherlockPrays.jpgMy wife hit the pause button! “What did he say?” We listened again. Sure enough, the Great Sherlock used the word pray when talking to a woman.

But doesn’t “pray” mean worship? In our old Evangelical Protestant days we assumed PRAY was synonymous with WORSHIP. But that was because we were ignorant of our own English language (blame the public schools). 

In the English language, the word pray is much less ostentatious than we Evangelicals blew it up to be. Here is what Wiktionary says,  

1. To petition or solicit help from a supernatural or higher being.
2. To humbly beg a person for aid or their time.
3. (Christianity) to talk to God for any reason.

The least significant usage of the word is to “talk to God” which is still a far cry from falling on one’s face in adoration and worship—an action reserved for the Trinity alone. 

It primarily means to ask of a higher being—which could certainly mean a superior in business, or law or in heaven—for a favor or for their help. It means to ask any person for aid or for their time.  

What was Sherlock Holmes asking when he “prayed” to this woman? He was saying, “Please, I ask you to continue.” Did he worship the woman? Of course not. 

But if we earthy humans ask the assistance and intercession of those who have preceded us to heaven, are we worshiping them or somehow giving them glory that belongs to God alone? CommunionofSaints.jpg

Well let’s ask this—if I ask my brother or sister in Christ on earth to “pray” for me, am I taking away from the glory of God by “praying” or asking them to “pray” or ask God to help me? Of course not, because prayer (talking and asking) and worship are two very different things. 

If I ask a saint who is already in heaven to petition God for me, am I committing idolatry? What foolishness, or course not. I am simply acknowledging that I am not the only Christian in the universe and that the Church is not just made up of me or many earthlings.

Christians, such as Mary and the Apostles, are not dead and gone. They are very much alive before the throne of God. It is made up of all of us still waiting for heaven, but it is also made up of those who have gone on before us with the sign of faith.

You may get asked, “Where in the Bible does it say we should pray to dead saints?” And my answer is always the same, “Where does the Bible say that saints are dead? We Catholic believe in Eternal Life!” 

Again, it is the Evangelical who not only misunderstands spiritual things, but also the English language. I was the most guilty of all, but I had ears to hear (thanks be to God) and I now understand the cosmic reality of the Church and the Communion of Saints. I am much the richer for it. 

Like Sherlock, I can pray to or ask any human creature for information or intercession or help. But it is God alone that I worship. I will ask or pray to any of his people, on earth or in heaven—asking them to intercede or pray for me to the Lord our God. We are after all a big family and the God whom we worship is the Father of us all.

I am so glad I found the Catholic Church and escaped the muddle of mucked up ideas I used to call “Bible-only Christianity.”

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Tops List of World's 50 Greatest Leaders

Francis Heads List of 50 Persons Chosen for “Energizing Their Followers and Making World Better”

NEW YORK, March 20, 2014 (Zenit.org) – The global business magazine has named Pope Francis the world’s greatest leader in a world “starved for leadership,” it says.

The list of 50 men and women “some famous, others little known” have been chosen for “energizing their followers and making the world better,” the magazine continues.

Since his election, “Francis has electrified the Church and attracted legions of non-Catholic admirers by energetically setting a new direction,” the magazine says. 

Fortune notes that Francis “recently asked the world to stop the rock-star treatment” but adds: “He knows that while revolutionary, his actions so far have mostly reflected a new tone and intentions. His hardest work lies ahead.”

It says that “signs of a “Francis effect” abound” and draws attention to a poll in March in which one in four Catholics said they’d increased their charitable giving to the poor this year it says. “Of those, 77% said it was due in part to the Pope,” it says.

Others to make the list include German Chancellor Angelo Merkel, the businessman Warren Buffett, and the Burmese rights activist, Aung San Suu Kyi. 

In the year since his election, the Pope has been named Person of the Year by Time, and made the cover of Rolling Stone magazine, among others. 

Fortune is a global business magazine published by Time Inc. and founded in 1930.

To read more, click here.    To see them all, click here.

Interesting, Obama did NOT make the list!

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